Aug
24
2009

Jury Rigged Sail Canoe

I’ve been using an inflatable sailboat from sailboatstogo for about year and a half and it’s been pretty good. The only problem is what to do when there is wind and your hull has a leak. (besides waiting for the glue to cure ;-) ). The hull was actually opened up by a wren that was nesting in it. I was looking at the parts after finding that my patch needed a patch (which worked), and realized that I could jury rig the floating boat rig onto an old-town canoe. A similar tension rig would probably work on other boats that have seats and thwarts that aren’t injection molded. Pelican owners are probably out of luck with this.

As it is supposed to look

As it is supposed to look

The key trick is to use a 3-way lashing for the cross pieces. Have one lashing between the center of the cross piece and two shorter lashings tying the piece to the seat. (The pictures will make this clear). Extend the perpendicular struts that hold the leeboards and lash them to the yoke. The keel boards will have to be moved closer to the sail support. Since I used my bowline as one of the lashings I had an extra tie which was used to lash a spare paddle to the boat.

The bow lashings

The bow lashings

The important question is how well does it work?

Surprisingly well, although it could use some tuning and I suspect (hope) that the clamps for the company will help. The mast should be a little closer to the bow, which would help it tack. The arms that support the leeboards can shift, which is a little exciting when you are tacking in a strong wind. The steering oar was very useful as it could be used to swing you around when tacking, because the boat as trimmed didn’t head into the wind. (this probably would work better on something longer than a 14 foot canoe) Unfortunately due to the stern of the boat it was necessary to swap sides when tacking because it couldn’t rudder hard in both directions.

The stern lashings

The stern lashings

That said I was sailing in 5-15 MPH winds and didn’t tip over. Didn’t really come close to tipping over. I sat on the bottom with my back to the stern seat, which helped, and have just finished canoeing in stiffer water on Norther Tier – which helped even more. It handled very well. Only seats one though on my rather small canoe.

p.s. I had an email exchange with Jim Luckett from sailboatstogo and this is pretty much how the kit gets put onto a canoe, but with clamps rather than lashings. He suggests that moving the leeboards forward will improve the helm (I have a bit too much lee helm).

Written by Rob in: engineering,outdoors |

No Comments »

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URL

Leave a comment

Powered by WordPress | Aeros Theme | TheBuckmaker.com WordPress Themes